updated 7 March 2007
updated 8 July 2008 - added poster
updated 12 April 2011 - added Jons photo link Flickr
updated 12 Feb 2012 - added soundboard source
updated 29 March 2015 - full tape review

cdr a - popular version - Sound 3 - 84min - low - tracks 22 [missing 5 tracks] - last updated 2003

cdr b - 4 new tracks sdbd? - Sound 3 - 84min - bc/m - tracks 23 [missing 4 tracks] - last updated 2003

cdr c - sound upgrade edited - Sound 3 - 60min - bc/m - tracks 17 [missing 10 tracks] - last updated 2003

cdr d - master NEW SOURCE - audience - Sound 4 - 92mins - tracks 26 [cuts IFL omits Garage] - last updated 7 March 2007

cdr e Soundboard – first gen. Sound 5 - very good, clear but not pro. 28 tracks including intro (except 4 tracks Janie-Safe Euro aud dub) – last updated 2011

Exceptional gig, exceptional recording (only soundboard) make this THE bootleg to have of the tour. Mick’s last Clash gig in their hometown and it’s a terrific performance from its blistering start through to the finish. Mick’s father, it was reported was there the first time to see him play. Joe conceded that after Topper’s sacking there were still a handful of nights when it still “burned” as he put it, this gig was surely one of them. Considered on IMCT as one of the five best Terry shows.

We owe a huge debt of thanks to Dave Newson for bringing his soundboard recording into circulation in 2011 (and to Derek Harris for his master audience recording in 2007) which together capture the whole memorable performance. A mystery however still remains unsolved as to the connection between Dave’s recording and the flyer below 

The flyer advertises an October 27th broadcast on 103.8FM advertised as Radio Clash with a broadcast from Brixton Fair Deal. We know the Clash wanted to have their own radio station due to the dire nature generally of commercial and BBC stations and a tape circulates of Paul as a DJ spinning his selection. The flyer is signed by Joe and Mick so clearly endorsed by the band. Of the three 1982 Brixton shows only one soundboard is known to exist and therefore the obvious assumption is the master tape (from which Dave’s tape is a copy of) from this gig was the source for this broadcast. 

What we do know is a 103.8 FM was used by Dread Broadcasting Corporation. An internet search finds this;

The Dread Broadcasting Corporation was launched in 1981, after the death of Bob Marley, by his brother-in-law Leroy Lepke Anderson (Leroy’s sister Rankin’ Miss P has the inauguration in ’79). The Portobello pirate radio station had a market stall outside 303 (then the Black People’s Information Centre, formerly Back-a-Yard cafe), and 286 (Better Badges) as their mailing address. As they went ‘dread outta control’ from a Neasden garden shed, from 6 to 12 every Friday night on Rebel Radio 103.8fm, you could ‘tune in if you rankin’ to their militant insurgency. The DBC DJ line-up included Neneh Cherry, Paul Simonon, Keith Allen and Lloyd Bradley. As most pirate stations acquired licences, rather than sell out, DBC continued as a sound-system/stall. Back in the mid-80s, his sister (and Bob Marley’s sister-in-law) Rankin’ Miss P was recruited by the BBC, from DBC, to host the Sunday night Radio 1 reggae show. Thus fulfilling DBC’s aim of getting a national radio show specialising in militant 70s reggae, though she had to moderate the Jamaican patois. 

What we don’t know was if it was ever broadcast (was it scrapped because of Bernie or CBS) and if it was why no other tape copies exist, unless the source of the original poorer soundboard tape (differences in song order) bought in Portobello market in 1983/4 was from the broadcast. Where is the master now, is it in Mick's "attic"! Can anyone help clear up this mystery?

Cat was also at the gig; ..if I remember rightly either Tenpole Tudor or JoBoxers were supporting that night. I do remember meeting Mikey Dread walking about the venue before the show he was heavily stoned, On the boot you can hear Joe saying something about promotion after Bankrobber that's because as Mickey walked on at the start of Bankrobber he threw some 12" singles into the audience. Great memories from when I had a full head of hair:cry.

We know on an earlier UK tour Joe had argued with Mick and had punched him full in the face for refusing to play White Riot. Mick had countered that Joe had no respect for the stage. It can only be guessed at the reasons why, for the only time since 76, they started with White Riot at Brixton. Or was it - 101 Walterton has commented: 

 I was at the Poole Arts Centre gig on 27/7/82 (3 days earlier) and although I don’t have a recording or the set list I am positive the Clash opened with White Riot. I can remember reading reviews of the tour before the gig and the Clash had been criticised for not playing enough early material, when they opened with WR the place just went off. 

It is possible (but unlikely) then The Clash had been starting with White Riot as early as Inverness on the 24th as no recording exists from Edinburgh on the 23rd until this Brixton gig. We do know it was dropped from the next nights gig in Brighton and the last two nights of the tour in Bristol. The only known gig it later kicked things off was at Pier 84 in New York.

Whatever the reasons for it, the impact on the Brixton audience, which this writer witnessed and was swept up in, was a shockwave of excitement, leading to a huge surge towards the stage with the metal terrace-like stanchions collapsing. No one appeared to be hurt fortunately and it lit the touch paper on an incendiary night for band and audience, both feeding off the energy of the other. If anyone says The Clash were a spent force after Topper’s sacking play them this recording.  

Venue

This venue had a special meaning to Mick and Paul well before they played there as Paul told the Guardian in 2013 as it was the cinema he and Jones went to as children. "It's actually where I saw my first ever pop show..We all turned up as 10-year-olds, and they said: 'Right, boys and girls, we've got a special surprise for you - we're not going to show you a film!' So everyone was: 'Booooo.' 'No. we've got a special surprise – we have Sandie Shaw!' And Sandie Shaw came on, and she was going on about not having any shoes. So we had an hour set from her, and that was my first pop concert."

The venue started life as a cinema and theatre in 1929 on the site of a private garden in Stockwell Road. It was built at a cost of £250,000 as an "Astoria" theatre. The opening show was the Al Jolson film The Singing Fool; a description for him Strummer might have welcomed! The building still retains many of its original features, including the proscenium arch and Art Deco interior. The Astoria eventually closed its doors as a cinema on 29 July 1972. It was then converted into the Sundown Centre rock venue in September 1972, but was not a success and the Sundown closed down some four months later. In May 1974 planning permission was sought to demolish the Grade II listed building and replace it with a motor showroom and petrol station. However, fortunately the redevelopment scheme was scrapped. The building was kept heated after it closed, and was used as an equipment store by the Rank Organisation.

In 1981, The Astoria, remodelled  was re-opened as a rock venue called "The Fair Deal" with a concert by UB40 and an interior restoration, but the venue closed in late 1982 due to debt. The venue was bought by Simon Parkes in 1983 and in the same year re-opened as Brixton Academy. The Academy's success steadily grew throughout the 1980s with numerous reggae productions and it was hired out to major rock and pop acts such as Eric Clapton, Dire Straits & The Police for rehearsal. In 1995, Break For The Border bought the Brixton Academy. Under its new ownership (McKenzie Group), reinvestment started immediately with a complete £500,000 refurbishment of the Art Deco building frontage to its original grandeur, additional facilities both front of house and backstage and a capacity increase to just under 5,000.

The venue now known as the 02 Academy has also been voted venue of the year twelve times since 1994 in the annual NME Awards. The Smiths played their last ever gig here in December 1986 which was an Anti-Apartheid benefit. Dylan and the reformed Sex Pistols have been  amongst the many acts choosing the venue as it is one of the biggest non arena venues in London. This was a key reason why The Clash hosted all their London shows there in 82 and 84 with the vast downstairs area unseated for dancing; maximum capacity is 4,921 (3,760 standing downstairs; 1,083 seated and 78 standing in the circle).

2011 Soundboard source; Many thanks indeed to Dave Newson for sending his tape, a refreshing contrast to those sad teasers who say they have recordings but never let anyone hear them! Dave provided this account of the tape’s origin:  

'I got it about a week or two after the gig from a guy who was with the 'Peace Convoy' that had set up camp on the outskirts of Norwich that summer. He said he was part of The Clash road crew and just gave me the tape, it had no cover or anything written on the tape itself. Couple of years later I went to see Clash 2 at the same venue and this guy was in the foyer handing out flyers for The Men They Couldn't Hang (who were supporting that night) and had a tour pass card on, so maybe he was part of the later crew... I don't know. He didn't remember me as such but certainly remembered being parked up in Norwich and meeting some local Clash fans'

The first generation tape is a significant upgrade on the earlier circulating soundboard but is still missing the four songs on that but with a much better wider clearer and more detailed sound. Sadly copied to a TDK D a better quality tape would have made a big difference. Nevertheless all instrumentation and vocals are very clear as you would expect from a soundboard source but with little stereo separation except strangely occasionally when Terry does a drum roll! Mick's guitar is low in the mix on the first  songs.

The unfettered digital transfer was provided on lossless on the blackmarketclash.com with the missing tracks from the analogue sources to give the whole complete show.

2007 master audience recording; Many thanks once again to Derek Harris for circulating another of his recordings, one that includes almost all the missing material from the best soundboard source. It does though lose most of I Fought The Law and Garageland. Sound has a rather thin and distant sound reflecting the equipment used but as it is a master is crisp and clear.   

Older sources; These are virtually redundant now following the more recent upgrades. There are two audience sources of unknown generation; one cuts out during Straight To Hel, the other has marginally better sound but only 17 of the 27 songs. The earlier soundboard source came from Portobello Market back in the day (a centre for vinyl and cassette bootleg sellers) and comes presumably from the same master source as the 2011 soundboard. Radio Clash though has been switched to follow Charlie Don't Surf. The tape then loses the next four songs as on the 201 tape.

OLDER REVIEW OF CICULATING TAPES

Two sources - Three tapes

A plethora tapes circulate with the quality, due to copying, varying from ok to very poor.

They seem to come from two sources, though the second one (maybe a flawed soundboard?) is very rare. (b)

The first source (audience) providing virtually all copies in circulation, and nearly always of a lesser quality than the bootleggers original. (a) & (c)

Source A

The most popular source (a) is an incomplete audience tape. The tape which cuts off during Straight to Hell. Upgrades to this circulate. This upgrade came in a pink sleeve. It has quite a reasonable sound.

There is some distortion on the sound, particularly on the vocals when the decibels rise. Otherwise the is a good width of sound, the drums, vocal and lead coming throughand the bass a bit. It is a little distant too. The encore tracks 24 to 27 are missing. This tape includes the intro, the flawed soundboard does not.

Source B

Source b also circulates with the above cover, but with much a much lesser sound, may be due to a bad copy. More noise, less sound, more distortion. However the bootleggers use the same typeface as on the bootleg artwork found on the audience source.

It seems to be a flawed soundboard, though it may not be. This tape is from a different recording source which has tracks previously missing from all other Clash bootlegs. It also has some tracks edited out. This has been a rare source. It is stereo mixed in parts and came from Camden Market tape traders shortly after the gig.

It starts with White Riot and has no intro. Radio Clash has been switched to follow Charlie Don't Surf. The tape then loses the next four songs.

Straight to Hell is unedited and four extra songs appear which are omitted out of the other two tapes.

All the instrumentation is clear if not crisp and even Joe’s scratchy rhythm guitar work comes through clearly. Joe improvises vocals on a number of songs and Mick’s lead guitar work is excellent and inventive throughout.

Radio Clash has some distortion and the sound is a bit flatter than the on the best audience, particularly a couple of the middle tracks which suffer more. However the encore tracks are perfectly fine, the best part of the tape luckily. The cover has also been seen in blue.

Source C

This is a variant of the audience source, mixed, with tracks selectively edited out. There is a marginal sound improvement on this over the fuller audience source (a)

Janie Jones has been moved before Charlie Dont Surf on the tape. It is cut at 1:32.

The recording also starts just as the intro begins.

It contains only 17 of the 27 songs. It has much more clarity, mix and balence and no real distortion, however the top end is a touch thin and it is still distant.

There was an absence of artwork on this one

Three Tapes - two sources

a b c d
Intro 0 0
White Riot 1 1 1 1
London Calling 2 2 2 2
This Is Radio Clash 3 13a 3 3
The Leader 4 4 4 4
Career Opportunities 5 5 5 5
Guns of Brixton 6 6 6
Somebody Got Murdered 7 7 7 7
Rockers Galore 8 8 8
Magnificent 7 9 9 9 9
Know Your Rights 10 10 10
Train in Vain 11 11 11 11
Charlie Dont Surf 12 12 12 12
Janie Jones 13 13 13
Rock the Casbah 14 14 14
Police on My back 15 15 15
Safe European Home 16 16 16
Clampdown 17 17 17 17
Ghetto Defendent 18 18 18 18
Armagideon Time 19 19 19
Brand New Cadilac 20 20 20
Stay Free 21 21 21 21
English Civil War 22 22 22
Stright to Hell 23* 23 23* 23
Should I Stay or Should I Go 24 24
Police and thieves 25 25
I Fought the Law 26 26*
Garageland 27
22 23 17 26
* track is edited and incomplete


The 2011 soundboard begins with the Morricone intro music, the quality of the recording immediately apparent. Then after Joe says a  “Good evening and welcome” Mick screams out  “1-2-3-4” and the band blast into White Riot taking the audience by surprise and then by storm. The recording with Terry thumping away and Mick’s lead guitar too far back in the mix does not convey the impact this had on the packed stalls, creating a huge surge towards the stage. “Are you taking over or are you taking orders” Place went mad.

Then straight into London Calling excellent performance like most tonight; Joe’s in fine vocal form, the band really tight and standing close to the stage The Clash front line looked as cool as fuck. “Michael” shouts Joe a grumbled “Come on come on” wanting to maintain the energy of both band and audience, Mick then strikes the opening chord to The Leader but then changes it to Radio Clash with Joe letting rip a blood curdling scream. A truly excellent performance, Mick’s guitar fills, still a little too far back are great, Paul’s bass lines clear and Joe in great voice “down down down” he orders into an  extended section with echo and effects to the fore.

Then with “This is the national anthem” it really is The Leader, Mick’s guitar intro now loud and clear and the first time we hear the odd stereo effect on Terry’s drum roll, Joe and Mick’s vocals very clear, sounds terrific. Career Opportunities maybe not as strong but with the sound cranked up this soundboard source is hugely enjoyable.   

Joe then addresses the audience (with a theme on his mind this tour in interviews) “OK lets have the lights on a minute, hands up all those who think we live in America? Come on be honest! OK this is Mr Paul Simonon with the Guns of … “Terry’s drums to the fore at start then scratchy rhythm from Paul on Joe’s guitar, Mick’s inventive fills clear; great clarity. Guns of Brixton again sounding great on this tour. There’s either an amazing segue mid song into Mensworth Hill or the original tape twisted over for a few seconds! 

“And so now it’s the guns of Finsbury Park, could be anybody really” says Joe over Mick’s intro to Somebody Got Murdered “it was murder” remembering the real incident that inspired his lyric. Terry manages to get to the top of the drumming crescendo intro for a change, there’s lots of echo on the “murdered” chorus and Joe’s section of the vocals again the stand out part of what is a particularly effective and enjoyable performance.

“Hey everyone always asks me, they come up to me, you’re Joe Strummer aren’t you. I go yeah, we’d like to do an interview for this magazine called Turkey Necks I say OK. Do you think you can change the world? I go well I dunno about that ask again in the next century – anyway what I am trying to say is Mikey Dread is gonna walk on here” and with a strum of his guitar Joe and then both Joe and Mick “sing my daddy was a Bankrobber” a capella.  Joe adlibs mid song “ do you think you can change the world  then Mikey toasts about Brixton around Rockers Galore UK tour  “The Clash a superstar, Terry Chimes superstar!” Joe again in great vocal form, another highlight. 

Magnificent Seven also sounds great, the detail in the instrumentation captured by the soundboard quality recording; Joe adlibs “if only Ian Dury was here to see this” and goes into lengthy rap over the instrumental section, then as the band drop it down Joe goes  “how long we been doing this song anyone got a watch, fuckin’ long in it!” and then repeats “Magnificent” in great voice over the finale.  

Then in plummy posh voice Joe announces “The following is a public service announcement with guitar”. Terry’s repetitive dominant beat lacks the swing Topper would have brought to Know Your Rights  but it still sounds great here. Highlight is when the band drop it right down to drum and bass  and Joe semi whispers “this has been suggested in some quarters is not enough”. Straight into Train In Vain next; Mick too is on top form tonight, his solos inventive and effective particularly over final coda.

Then Joe scratches out on his guitar an intro to (a by now rare) Charlie Don’t Surf, and says “This is supposed to be a Chinook sitting on your head (Apocalypse Now was the first time many had heard the use of surround sound in cinemas, something the film excelled at) .. if you don’t know what a Chinook is ask the person next to you” Another highlight; the combination of Mick’s inventively effective  guitar playing and the brilliant way Mick and Joe interweave their contrasting but complementary vocals on chorus particularly enjoyable. Joe adlibs as Mick repeats” Charlie don’t surf” at the end as he shouts “and we know he ain’t no good” Mick unleashes a great guitar attack. Only shame is it is not further extended. 

“May I introduce the moody alcoholic Mr Terry Chimes” jokes Joe by way of introduction to Janie Jones. It sounds great with Mick’s guitar by now up in the mix but unfortunately the soundboard tape cuts out  a minute in. Derek Harris’ master audience recording (largely)fills the gap before the soundboard restarts at start of Clampdown. Mick’s different and dominant guitar sound clear on the start of Rock The Casbah; whilst the sound quality dips, the performances do not. Mick belts out Police On My Back with gusto, followed by a fine if unexceptional Safe European Home.

The soundboard misses the beginning of Clampdown but the sound is now if anything a notch better through to the end of the gig. Again there’s that strange stereo tracked drum roll effect and also again Joe and Mick’s vocal interplay clear and highly enjoyable. You know it’s a good night when Strummer adlibs and includes reference to the Shah of Iran and a vegetable samosa! With a “Merci beaucoup” from Joe the band leave the stage.

The soundboard stops here restarting at beginning of Ghetto Defendant but the audience recordings capture the amusing start to the first encore as Joe ponders a solitary boot on the stage; “I tell you I recognise this boot somewhere before in my life, I’ve met that boot. Cinderella come forth, has anybody seen Cinderella! What size are your feet Cinderella?..Gonna fit, gonna fit! Cinderella!? Maybe its Lady Diana Spencer’s so gonna look for a name tag in it, you’re dead right!” (to Mick’s suggestion).

After a pause Joe sings “hungry darkness of living” but it’s a low par Ghetto Defendant, the band not back fully engaged but after the segue into Armagideon Time and it gets a whole lot better. Joe’s now more intense, working through his vocal chops and Mick’s guitar fills are very effective. A fine performance and proof that Joe’s fully engaged again he adlibs “a lot of people are frightened out of their mind, a lot of people are going blind, a lot of people learning to hide 50 feet underground, a lot of people are tunnelling to the back of their mind” and later even Bruce Lee gets a namecheck!

 “OK now we come to the most political part of the evening this is by well-known Marxist Vince Taylor!”  Brand New Cadillac; the band rip it up with some great Mick lead guitar. Joe then starts in Strummer Spanish but Mick interrupts with a shouted “Where’s me fiver Crocker” and bursts into Stay Free the subject of the song presumably in the audience. Again an excellent, sounding performance with Mick’s playing on the ending coda particularly strong. It gets better still with a terrific English Civil War, the audience providing the “hurrahs” and after “Adios” the first encore is over.

The band are quick to return but not before a “good evening” mic check from a roadie gets an immediate “fuck off” from the audience! Then thump, thump, thump of Terry’s bass drum starts an excellent Straight To Hell and the band return one by one including Mick in his army surplus gas mask. Joe’s voice is clear and focussed maximising the power of his lyrics, Mick’s excellent guitar work is to the fore and Joes’ vocals almost ethereal bathed in effects/echo then brought up higher on the desk by the soundman. One of the best sounding and performed versions period. Excellent.

“Maintenant this is the one I gave you a Spanish introduction to” (earlier) Mick goes into his Should I Stay or Should I Go, his solo being the highlight and Joe’s Strum/Spanish over the ending. ”Whooo whooo” wails Joe  as instruction to Police & Thieves which for a few seconds in suffers a tape twist (opposite side to GOB) to which an insert from alt. source has been placed. A definite highlight of the night; it sounds tremendous with Mick’s lead guitar, Joe’s rhythm, Terry’s drumming Paul’s bass lines and not least Joe and Mick’s vocals combining brilliantly. Joe’s in great voice, Mick’s echoed, the vocal interplay sounds amazing and it’s tragic to think this is the last time they would share a London stage until Acton 20 years later. There was from the evidence alone of this recording still magical chemistry together between them on stage – Liz Taylor or not! When the song drops down to drum and bass Joe adlibs in a classic Strummer rant blending the ludicrous with wit “Well in patients, you are an outpatient, , you have patience, you have in patience, Friday night you look funny wearing a pair of curtains look at that funny looking bleeder over there I think we should pick him up” With a Strummer cry it’s brought to an end and then straight into an exceptional I Fought The Law; fast hard and true, the band on fire now. “Robbing people with a six gun” gets the stereo drum effect again and Terry’s drums sound like a horse stampede! 

Then after a twice repeated instrumental intro to maximise effect and drama the Clash blast through an equally exceptional Garageland. It’s gets changes to the arrangement too and Mick adds the flying fuck to the where the rich are going line. “Go on Terry” shouts Joe in encouragement over the songs tremendous finale. A magnificent end to a magnificent night.

“Good night and hope you have a good dance afterwards!” but this writer does not remember if the intention but largely unrealised Casbah Club post gig dance took place but does remember standing in a packed Victoria line tube train, drenched in sweat, ears ringing but with a big grin on the face. Memories that have lasted most of a lifetime of the only band that mattered.

"The clash gig at Brixton 30/7/82 the Clash opened with White Riot for the first time since 1976 after a fight between Joe and Mick. I was at the Poole Arts Centre gig on 27/7/82 (3 days earlier) and although I dont have a recording or the set list I am positive the Clash opened with White Riot. I can remember reading reviews of the tour before the gig and the Clash had been critised for not playing enough early material, when they opened with WR the place just went off. - B.

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White Riot
London Calling
This Is Radio Clash
The Leader
Career Opportunities
Guns of Brixton
Somebody Got Murdered
Rockers Galore
Magnificent 7
Know Your Rights
Train in Vain
Charlie Dont Surf
Janie Jones
Rock the Casbah
Police on My back
Safe European Home
Clampdown
Ghetto Defendent
Armagideon Time
Brand New Cadilac
Stay Free
English Civil War
Stright to Hell
Should I Stay or Should I Go
Police and thieves
I fought the Law
Garageland



Tape 1
17 tracks only -
omits 10 including the last 4
~ For a Few Dollars More
White Riot
London Calling
This Is Radio Clash
The Leader
Career Opportunities
Somebody Got Murdered
Magnificent 7
Train in Vain
Charlie Dont Surf
Janie Jones
Rock the Casbah
Police on My Back
Safe European Home
Clampdown
Ghetto Defendent
Stay Free
Straight to Hell

Tape 2
all tracks upto St to Hell
omits the last 4
~ For a Few Dollars More
White Riot
London Calling
This Is Radio Clash
The Leader
Career Opportunities
Guns of Brixton
Somebody Got Murdered
Rockers Galore
Rockers Galore ... continued
Magnificent 7
Know Your Rights
Train in Vain
Charlie Dont Surf
Janie Jones
Rock the Casbah
Police on My back
Safe European Home
Clampdown
Ghetto Defendent
Armagideon Time
Brand New Cadilac
Stay Free
English Civil War
Straight to Hell

Tape 3
only tape with the last 4 songs
Poorer though and
omits tracks 12, 13, 14, 15
White Riot
London Calling
This Is Radio Clash
The Leader
Career Opportunities
Guns of Brixton
Somebody Got Murdered
Rockers Galore
Magnificent 7
Know Your Rights
Train in Vain
Charlie Dont Surf
Clampdown
Ghetto Defendent
Armagideon Time
Brand New Cadilac
Stay Free
English Civil War
Stright to Hell
Should I Stay or Should I Go
Police and thieves
I fought the Law
Garageland

NME review

Melody Maker Review

Review from September 1982 Zig Zag magazine of the July 30 1982 Fair  Deal concert.

Photos from Jon [Flickr]

Any further info / reviews appreciated


Support on some dates Southern Death Cult & Under Two Flags.
Jul 10 Fair Deal, Brixton, London
Jul 11 Fair Deal, Brixton, London
Jul 12 Aylesbury Buckinghamshire - Stoke Mandeville Hospital Sports Stadium
...Poster ...Ticket ...Poster2 ...Poster3 ...Flyer
This was a 'charity' gig for the spinal injuries unit where I was working at the time - I managed to blag myself on to the guest list when Joe came to visit before the gig! 
Jul 13 Victoria Hall, Hanley
Jul 14 City Hall, Newcastle
Jul 15 City Hall, Newcastle
Jul 17 Bradford St Georges Hall
new date - resheduled from the 11th May
Jul 18 Bingley Hall, Birmingham
On the Road with the Clash
Traxmarx - includes this gig
Jul 19 Assembly Rooms, Derby
Jul 20 De Montfort, Leicester
Jul 22 Leisure Centre, Irvine
Jul 23 Playhouse, Edinburgh,
This was the Friday night show which was apparently filmed. A second hasty date was added for Sunday after returning from Inverness.
Jul 24 Ice Rink, Inverness,
Supported by APB - i'd bought what i thought was a classy soviet 35mm camera to document the gig and only 2 pictures survived the event. the first is from the soundcheck and features mick jamimg the magnifent 7 in first album mode with the badge stall guy on drums. in the second joe's telling the wankers to stop spitting. photo 1 - photo 2
Jul 25 Playhouse, Edinburgh,
This was an extra date added at the last minute and not on tour itinery. Check recordings from this period closely as they may well exist?
Jul 26 University, Leeds
Jul 27 Arts Centre, Poole
Jul 28 Guildhall Portsmouth
Jul 30 Fair Deal, Brixton, London
Jul 31 Brighton Centre, Brighton
new date - resheduled from the 11th May?
Aug 2 Locarno, Bristol
Aug 3 Locarno, Bristol